floatingleaf: (poppy sunset)
[personal profile] floatingleaf
Apparently, it's been almost two weeks since my last update. At least that's what the calendar seems to indicate.:) I'm not sure I agree with it, but whatever. It's all a matter of perception. And perception is a huge topic for me these days.

What has kept me so busy over the past two/three weeks, other than the job search, has been following several "virtual events" I had signed up for, which consisted of interviews with various activists and experts on a variety of matters ranging from health and nutrition to spiritual growth and the environmental impact of our modern civilization. I have been listening to scientists, certified nutritionists, medical practitioners, psychiatrists, herbalists, Buddhist monks, indigenous energy healers, innovators, visionaries and people who fall under several of the above categories all at the same time. I have learned SO MUCH. It's almost an information overload - or rather an "insight overload", if that's possible. I would have preferred to spread it out more over time - but the thing with those online events is that they usually consist of a whole bunch of material that's only available for free on a very limited basis. For example, there are about 10 interviews you can watch during a 24-hour period - and if each one lasts about an hour or so... well, you do the math. Of course, you can "purchase" the entire conference, to have access to those audio or video files forever - but unless you're willing to spend a few hundred bucks, you'd better make time to listen to whatever interests you most while it's free. Which is what I did. Btw, I wouldn't have been able to catch half of that stuff if I were spending most of each day at work. Which is, perhaps, another sign that the layoff happened for a reason. Or that the timing of it wasn't accidental in the big scheme of things. Actually, if you believe some of the abovementioned esteemed speakers, nothing is ever accidental.:)

Speaking of which... I have almost finished reading Robin Hobb's Tawny Man trilogy - and it just so happens that while I was listening to all those talks on spiritual growth and development, I was also following a profoundly symbolic "hero's journey" which deals with precisely that, among other things. Coincidence? I think not. It really gives you the shivers when you see a character you love, and identify with to a large extent, undergoing a deep transformation at the same time that you think YOU might be undergoing SOME sort of transformation. But I don't even want to get started on that. It's too huge. I could spend a week explaining in great detail how incredibly awesome and meaningful those books are to me... and I can only think of one person who would care to read it. So perhaps it's better to save that for my next letter to that person.:) (In other words: [livejournal.com profile] tindomerel, brace yourself!... LOL.)

On a more mundane plane of existence, the dietary changes I've been making over the past few weeks have produced one unexpected result: my hay fever is as good as gone. Normally, at this time of year I would be stumbling around bleary-eyed, exhausted and choked down with mucus. I purposely stocked up on several kinds of allergy pills, to be able to figure out which ones worked best. But guess what? I don't need them anymore. I still sneeze every once in a while - and it's obviously the abrupt, explosive hay fever sneezing, which is very different from cold/flu sneezing - but there is hardly any mucus to go with it. I blow my nose maybe once a day. And I haven't even completely eliminated wheat or dairy from my diet - I just greatly reduced it, to see what might happen. And I really like what is happening so far. The one thing I managed to eliminate almost completely is processed sugar. As well as processed/refined vegetable oils. It's a tough order to do that here in the US... but it can be done. And I am perfectly happy to be the guinea pig in this type of experiment... LOL. No regrets whatsoever. I just wish I'd started the whole thing a few years earlier. But better late than never, as they say. Most people wait until their health goes downhill before they consider making even the slightest changes to their lifestyle. And the so-called Western culture makes it incredibly easy to do just that. There isn't a whole lot of reliable information out there on how to monitor your health - unless you actively look for it. And why would you bother looking for it if you believe that certain ailments/illnesses are "inevitable", because pretty much everyone around you seems to be getting them at a certain age?... Except for those Buddhist monks and indigenous shamans, perhaps. But they're just lucky, right? They're exposed to the same environmental toxins as everyone else, after all. Well... yes and no. It's one thing to be exposed to something, and another to deliberately invite it into your body. It's a matter of degree. Move a few inches down the scale, and suddenly a whole new world emerges around the corner. And perception has a huge impact on behavior. And vice versa. It's an upward spiral, if you will.

And with that strangely and unexpectedly uplifting message, I bid you good night.:)

(no subject)

Date: 2015-07-04 10:12 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] meathiel.livejournal.com
Interesting to read about your dietary changes ... I just can't imagine how you can cut out on sugar ...

(no subject)

Date: 2015-07-06 12:15 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] floatingleaf.livejournal.com
Well, I should probably clarify that I have NOT eliminated ALL sweeteners. I still put a bit of honey in my tea, and sometimes maple syrup in my morning bowl of oatmeal. Or stevia - which is a natural sweetener made from a plant. And I use a lot of fruit - both fresh and dried - in my salads, so that satisfies my "sweet tooth" rather nicely. I just don't ingest processed sugar or high fructose corn syrup (or synthetic artificial sweeteners, which are even worse). And, frankly, the most bothersome aspect of that is having to carefully read every label at the grocery store. But I find it well worth the effort, in the end. Besides, having all the information I have now about what sugar actually does to your body, I don't think I could ever go back... *shudder*

(no subject)

Date: 2015-07-06 05:16 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] meathiel.livejournal.com
High fructose syrup is not used (that much) here in Germany, that's a good thing.

(no subject)

Date: 2015-07-04 01:17 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] samtyr.livejournal.com
I'm so glad to know things are better. And it's surprising how much a change of diet can help.

About cutting out sugar: You might be interested in reading the book "Pure White and Deadly" by John Yudkin. It was first printed in 1972 but has since been reprinted.

(no subject)

Date: 2015-07-06 12:22 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] floatingleaf.livejournal.com
Thanks for the rec. I am well aware of the extensive damage sugar does to the body, from a variety of sources. It's pretty much the only thing all health experts, nutritionists etc. agree on, regardless of which particular diet they recommend. It's the first thing they say. Cut out table sugar, and THEN eat more (or less) of this or that or the other thing. That's a pretty clear message to me... LOL.

(no subject)

Date: 2015-07-05 05:58 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] shadow8740.livejournal.com
opportunityisnowhere.com can have a very different message depending on the one of the two ways it can be perceived. I wish you all the best on your journey.

(no subject)

Date: 2015-07-06 12:25 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] floatingleaf.livejournal.com
Haha, yes! It took me a moment to figure out what you meant.:) At first, I only noticed the more optimistic interpretation... which, I suppose, attests to my more optimistic frame of mind. So let's hope I stick to that... LOL.

(no subject)

Date: 2015-07-06 08:25 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] tindomerel.livejournal.com
Oh, sounds very good indeed! And I can't wait to read all your thoughts about the books and how they correlate with what you're going through. When i read them I also felt such great symbolism and meaning... I still do and that is partly why it's been so scary for me to read the new Fitz & Fool books... :)

(no subject)

Date: 2015-07-07 02:03 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] floatingleaf.livejournal.com
I just finished Fool's Fate yesterday. I have very mixed feelings. I mean, I am happy for Fitz & Molly and everyone else... but the Fool just breaks my heart. He deserves so much better than that. I can't wait to see his "comeback" in the next book - though I am a little scared of it, too... *rapid heartbeat* ;)

(no subject)

Date: 2015-07-07 04:41 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] tindomerel.livejournal.com
For me the ending was such a heartbreak for years and years. I actually cried over it for weeks. Maybe because I felt that such meaningful love (Fitz & Fool, not Fitz & Molly obviously!) never comes true/has a happily ever after sort of ending in real either life and it made me so sad.

I don't know if you should read the next books yet... I have no idea where they are going and what they'll do to the story. I liked the first one but it was very strange to read after all the years...

(no subject)

Date: 2015-07-08 02:03 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] floatingleaf.livejournal.com
I am not surprised at all that you cried over it. If I didn't know for sure that they were going to meet again in the next book, I would have cried too. I would have been devastated. It's almost as though Fitz did the Fool a disservice by bringing him back to life. It was selfish of him, in a way, though he didn't realize the full import of it... anyway, I could go on and on about this, and I will save it for snail mail (just got your letter, btw <3).

I have thought of taking a break before starting the new series... but I don't think I can stop myself from ordering the next book soon, and once I order it, I will begin to read it. So it's a lost cause...;)
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